What makes Sandy Point so special is that we live amongst tree and plant species that are indigenous and have evolved over many thousands of years. They are well adapted to the unique climatic and geological characteristics of this place. Many of these plants can still be found on residential properties, road reserves and nature strips within the township.


Unfortunately, you will also find many non-indigenous plants that are invasive weeds within the township and also in the bush and farmland around it. Dolichos Pea, Bridal Creeper and Cape Ivy are taking over many of the beach tracks and Mirror Bush, Ivy, Milkwort, Pittosporum, Blue Periwinkle, Asparagus-Fern, Arum Lily and even Agapanthus are spreading between properties within the town. These weeds can be very rampant, smothering the ground flora, shrubs and trees and preventing its regeneration and we need to be vigilant about controlling them.


Help us care for this wonderful place

The impact of climate change on natural environments across Australia heightens the important and urgent need to look after this beautiful and valuable pocket of landscape. So please be kind and help us care for this place that is a home to so many wonderful local plant and animal species.


Agapanthus

We recently published on our Facebook page a story about problems with the spread of Agapanthus in Sandy Point. Few people would realise that this pretty, easy to grow plant is in fact an Environmental Weed and is now becoming a serious problem in Sandy Point. It is classified as an Environmental Weed which is “a plant which threaten the values of natural ecosystems, can invade native plant communities and out compete them. This affects the balance of the entire ecosystem by reducing biodiversity, taking away vital food sources and habitat for native insects, bird life and fauna”.

The Fish Creek Community Composter group encouraged us to cut the heads off agapanthus after thy had finished flowering and provided jute bags to store the heads in and return to them to feed to their massive new composter “Oscar”.










Mirror Bush

Most residents and visitors will have noticed the abundance of Mirror Bush (Coprosma repens) throughout Sandy Point, though they may not have known it name or realised it is actually a weed. Originating in New Zealand, it was originally planted as a hardy, fast growing hedge/screening shrub, however it is now a Declared Weed (i.e. it must be controlled by land owners) in South Australia. In Victoria it is not currently declared, but is classified as an Environmental Weed which is “a plant which threaten the values of natural ecosystems, can invade native plant communities and out compete them. This affects the balance of the entire ecosystem by reducing biodiversity, taking away vital food sources and habitat for native insects, bird life and fauna

Mirror bush spreads very easily, as you may have seen from the seedlings that keep coming up in your garden! Parks Victoria is now seeing it spread by birds to the Islands in Corner Inlet and into the Prom, so as residents of Sandy Point we should do our bit to reduce its presence in the township.


So what can you do?

Use the South Gippsland Landcare Network’s list of noxious weeds at https://www.sgln.net.au/south-gippsland-weeds/weed-identification to identify those that must be controlled. In Victoria noxious weeds are plants which have been proclaimed under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994, which requires the Landholder to control or eradicate these weeds.

Many plants can be weeded by hand though large plants will need to be cut and the stumps treated immediately following cutting using Round Up (glyphosate) or other suitable herbicide.

Agapanthus heads and other environmental weeds like Mirror Bush should not be included in Council’s green waste bin as they need to go to land fill to prevent further spreading.

After you’ve removed the weeds, why not visit the local native nursery https://www.narkabundah.com.au for a selection of native plants that are well adapted to our coastal climate.


Help us control weeds in Sandy Point